Appearances

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Homelessness: A public health crisis

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Listen now to our show from  11/27/17, on KPFA.org 94.1FM

https://kpfa.org/archives

Being unhoused makes it difficult, and in some cases impossible, to access general health services. Poor health, addiction, mental illness, and violence are some things that lead to homelessness, and homelessness can make all of these things worse.

The majority of adults that experience homelessness have more than one health issue. They range from hypertension and diabetes to HIV and viral hepatitis, but the most significant reasons people go to emergency-rooms are mental illness and addiction. The sick and vulnerable become homeless, and the homeless become sicker and more vulnerable.

Guests:
Alejandro Soto-Vigil comes from a family of activists in the Bay Area. Last year he was re-elected to his second term on the Berkeley Rent Stabilization Board. After 8 years working in the City of Berkeley as a legislative aide, Alejandro now serves as the program manager for the Berkeley Drop-In Center, an organization that has served Berkeley’s homeless residents for over 25 years. Alejandro majored in political sciences at UC Berkeley. 

 

Jeffrey Seal is the medical director and interim director of Alameda County Health Care for the Homeless, as well as an Assistant Clinical Professor in the UCSF Department of Psychiatry. He has worked at the Child Psychiatry Branch of the National Institute of Mental Health. He completed his medical degree at Boston University, a psychiatry residency at UCSF, and a chief residency at San Francisco General Hospital. He grew up on the Gulf Coast of Alabama, and currently lives in Oakland CA. He is a current California Health Care Foundation Leadership fellow and has special interests in public health systems, social determinants of health, re-entry populations, and trauma.
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Stroke: Symptoms and Recovery

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Listen to About Health’s show from 11/20/17 

KPFA.org, 94.1FM 

A stroke happens every 40 seconds in the U.S. and is the fifth leading cause of death, killing about 140,000 Americans each year.

The average person loses 1.9 million brain cells every minute a stroke goes untreated. Recovery from a stroke is a life long process, and there are many people, like my guest, Dr. Diane Barnes, who have a story to tell that might help you or a loved one with recovery and hope.

Common Stroke Warning Signs and Symptoms

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm, or leg—especially on one side of the body.

  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding.

  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.

  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination.

  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause.

If you think someone may be having a stroke, act F.A.S.T. and do the following test:

F—Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

A—Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

S—Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is the speech slurred or strange?

T—Time: If you see any of these signs, call 9-1-1 right away.

Guests

Dr. Diane Barnes is a third generation physician. She is a graduate of Stanford University and Yale University School of Medicine, and is board certified in Diagnostic Radiology. She left the practice of medicine in 2010.  After surviving the catastrophe that inspired her one-women show, My Stroke of Luck, Diane Barnes discovered improvisation. Now a Meisner-trained actor, she also completed the American Conservatory Theater’s Summer Training Congress, and studied with Anna Deavere Smith, Ann Randolph, Keith Johnstone, and the Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre. You can find out more about her show, presented November 2-December 9, at www.themarsh.org,  or call The Marsh box office at 415-282-3055
Patricia Gill, MS, MFT, is the Executive Director at the Schurig Center. 
She started there in 2006 as a Teacher/Counselor and transitioned to Programs Director in 2007, and then Executive Director in 2009. Patricia earned a BA and MS in Clinical Psychology from San Francisco State University and has worked in research and clinical positions at UC Davis and UCSF. Other professional positions include management of an Alzheimer’s and Dementia residential program; administration of neuropsychological testing; teaching at the University of San Francisco; coordinating research projects at UCSF/USF; and providing psychotherapy services to individuals, couples, and groups. Patricia is passionate about providing services that enhance people’s lives and ability to meaningfully engage with the community.

 

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The Many Uses Of Medicinal Cannabis

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Are you curious about the ways cannabis is being used for various diseases and pain relief?

Tune in now to the 8/28/17 show on KPFA.org   https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=267049 

 

“It’s surprising that cannabis ever left our medicine cabinets, since the plant has been used for millennia in cultures throughout the world as a curative for ailments of both mind and body.” —Andrew Weil, M.D.

 Resources from the show:

https://cannabisnurses.org/

callaspringwellness.com

http://cannabisclinicians.org/

Guest:

Harry McIlroy, MD, is an integrative
physician certified with the Institute for Functional Medicine. Before medical school and completion of residency at Contra Costa Regional Medical Center, he had a background in nutrition and obtained a Master’s degree in acupuncture and Chinese medicine.

Dr. Harry McIlroy strives to provide patients with health tools that empower them to improve their well being.

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The Brain, Memory, and Dementia

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Listen now to todays show on About Health (June 26th) on @KPFA for a conversation about Dementia and the Brain.

 https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=262829

Dementia is an overall term that describes a wide range of symptoms associated with a decline in memory or other thinking skills, severe enough to reduce a person’s ability to perform everyday activities. Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60 to 80 percent of cases. Vascular dementia, which occurs after a stroke, is the second most common dementia type. But there are many other conditions that can cause symptoms of dementia. 

For local information on dementia care: http://daybreakcenters.org/

 

Josh Kornbluth, is currently engaged in a year-long residency as a scholar at the Global Brain Health Institute. He is spending his time with people who have dementia and their caregivers, as well as researchers, nurses, social workers, and others.  
Described as a cross between Woody Allen and Spalding Gray, Josh Kornbluth has been performing autobiographical one-man shows since 1987.  The San Francisco Chronicle declared, “Kornbluth takes a world we ignore, or barely observe, and brings it into brilliant comic relief.” He launched his career as a solo artist with Josh Kornbluth’s Daily World, in which he described his childhood as the son of communists in 1960s New York. He is currently working on a solo show based on his experiences as an artist-in-residence and volunteer at the Zen Hospice Project in San Francisco. For two years he hosted an interview program, “The Josh Kornbluth Show,” on KQED TV. His latest feature film, Love & Taxes, is his second in collaboration with his brother Jacob; in a review, Variety called him “a nerd for our time.” His first feature film, Haiku Tunnel, is currently on HBO. Check out his web site at http://joshkornbluth.com/
Dr. Jennifer Yokoyama is an Assistant Professor at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, where she is building an independent research program in neurogenetics of aging. More specifically, she is interested in how genomic variation influences brain anatomy, physiology, and cognitive behaviors in healthy older adults, and how genomic variation relates to vulnerability, as well as resilience, against neurodegenerative processes of aging. Dr. Yokoyama obtained her doctorate degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacogenomics in 2010 at UCSF and completed her postdoctoral training in neuroimaging at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center.
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