• Rona Renner,
    Rona Renner, "Is that Me Yelling?"
  • Managing the Anxiety of Parenting Teens
    Managing the Anxiety of Parenting Teens
  • How To Be A Good Parent On A Budget
    How To Be A Good Parent On A Budget
  • The View From The Bay - Discussing men's and women's communication
    The View From The Bay - Discussing men's and women's communication
  • AVG - The Digital Playground
    AVG - The Digital Playground
  • AVG Digital Diaries Episode 2: Digital Birth
    AVG Digital Diaries Episode 2: Digital Birth
  • AVG Digital Diaries Episode 3: Internet Safety for Six to Nine-Year-Olds
    AVG Digital Diaries Episode 3: Internet Safety for Six to Nine-Year-Olds
  • Shelly Rivoli with Rona Renner on The View from the Bay
    Shelly Rivoli with Rona Renner on The View from the Bay
  • Blossoming Mom Series (PART ONE)
    Blossoming Mom Series (PART ONE)
  • Blossoming Mom Series (PART TWO)
    Blossoming Mom Series (PART TWO)
  • Blossoming Moms Series (PART THREE)
    Blossoming Moms Series (PART THREE)
  • Blossoming Moms Series (PART FOUR)
    Blossoming Moms Series (PART FOUR)

Homelessness: A public health crisis

Listen now to our show from  11/27/17, on KPFA.org 94.1FM

https://kpfa.org/archives

Being unhoused makes it difficult, and in some cases impossible, to access general health services. Poor health, addiction, mental illness, and violence are some things that lead to homelessness, and homelessness can make all of these things worse.

The majority of adults that experience homelessness have more than one health issue. They range from hypertension and diabetes to HIV and viral hepatitis, but the most significant reasons people go to emergency-rooms are mental illness and addiction. The sick and vulnerable become homeless, and the homeless become sicker and more vulnerable.

Guests:

Alejandro Soto-Vigil comes from a family of activists in the Bay Area. Last year he was re-elected to his second term on the Berkeley Rent Stabilization Board. After 8 years working in the City of Berkeley as a legislative aide, Alejandro now serves as the program manager for the Berkeley Drop-In Center, an organization that has served Berkeley’s homeless residents for over 25 years. Alejandro majored in political sciences at UC Berkeley. 

 

Jeffrey Seal is the medical director and interim director of Alameda County Health Care for the Homeless, as well as an Assistant Clinical Professor in the UCSF Department of Psychiatry. He has worked at the Child Psychiatry Branch of the National Institute of Mental Health. He completed his medical degree at Boston University, a psychiatry residency at UCSF, and a chief residency at San Francisco General Hospital. He grew up on the Gulf Coast of Alabama, and currently lives in Oakland CA. He is a current California Health Care Foundation Leadership fellow and has special interests in public health systems, social determinants of health, re-entry populations, and trauma.

 

Stroke: Symptoms and Recovery

Listen to About Health’s show from 11/20/17 

KPFA.org, 94.1FM 

A stroke happens every 40 seconds in the U.S. and is the fifth leading cause of death, killing about 140,000 Americans each year.

The average person loses 1.9 million brain cells every minute a stroke goes untreated. Recovery from a stroke is a life long process, and there are many people, like my guest, Dr. Diane Barnes, who have a story to tell that might help you or a loved one with recovery and hope.

Common Stroke Warning Signs and Symptoms

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm, or leg—especially on one side of the body.
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding.
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination.
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause.

If you think someone may be having a stroke, act F.A.S.T. and do the following test:

F—Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

A—Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

S—Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is the speech slurred or strange?

T—Time: If you see any of these signs, call 9-1-1 right away.

Guests

Dr. Diane Barnes is a third generation physician. She is a graduate of Stanford University and Yale University School of Medicine, and is board certified in Diagnostic Radiology. She left the practice of medicine in 2010.  After surviving the catastrophe that inspired her one-women show, My Stroke of Luck, Diane Barnes discovered improvisation. Now a Meisner-trained actor, she also completed the American Conservatory Theater’s Summer Training Congress, and studied with Anna Deavere Smith, Ann Randolph, Keith Johnstone, and the Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre. You can find out more about her show, presented November 2-December 9, at www.themarsh.org,  or call The Marsh box office at 415-282-3055

Patricia Gill, MS, MFT, is the Executive Director at the Schurig Center. 

She started there in 2006 as a Teacher/Counselor and transitioned to Programs Director in 2007, and then Executive Director in 2009. Patricia earned a BA and MS in Clinical Psychology from San Francisco State University and has worked in research and clinical positions at UC Davis and UCSF. Other professional positions include management of an Alzheimer’s and Dementia residential program; administration of neuropsychological testing; teaching at the University of San Francisco; coordinating research projects at UCSF/USF; and providing psychotherapy services to individuals, couples, and groups. Patricia is passionate about providing services that enhance people’s lives and ability to meaningfully engage with the community.

 

Traumatic Brain Injuries: Recovery and Repair

Listen now: https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=271121

Whether you’re a professional athlete, high school soccer player, in the military, a victim of a traffic accident, or an elder who has fallen, a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) will change your brain and often your life.

At least  3.17 million Americans are living with long-term disabilities related to TBI. An integrative approach is essential to healing.

Dr. Dan Engle was my guest on KPFA.org, 94.1FM, Oct.23 2017, to discuss causes and treatments of TBI’s.

Guest:

Dr. Dan Engle is Board Certified in Psychiatry and Neurology, with a clinical practice that combines functional medicine, intergratie psychiatry, neuro-cognitive restoration and peak performance methods. He lectures and consults globally and is the medical advisor to Onnit Labs, the True Rest Float Centers and several international treatment centers using indigenous plant medicines for healing and recovery. His other programs include: Freedom From Meds and Full Spectrum Medicine. You can learn more about him at http://drdanengle.com/

You can order his book at: https://www.amazon.com/Concussion-Repair-Manual-Practical-Recovering/dp/1946697346/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

Sleep Sweet Sleep

Listen now to the show we did on About Health (10/2/17) on KPFA.org

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=269492

We discussed the complexities of getting a good night sleep and talked about insomnia, jet lag, circadian rhythms, shift work, electronics, and other sleep concerns.

 

 

 

Healthy adults needed for shift work study!

Research being done at Palo Alto VA: Call 650-849-1971 or email yvonne.quevedo@va.gov
for more information, or check out the facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/vapahcs/posts/10153954103298158:0

Guest

 Jamie Zeitzer, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine and a health science specialist at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. He is a member of the Stanford Center on Longevity, Child Health Research Institute, and Stanford Neurosciences Institute. Dr. Zeitzer’s work has direct application in jet lag, shift work, and altered sleep timing in teens and older individuals.

Another Kind Of Madness: Humanizing Mental Illness

If you missed todays show (8/21/17) Listen Now to About Health

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=266588

What is it like to live with a parent with mental illness who keeps his illness a secret? And how do we as individuals and as a society reduce the stigma associated with illnesses such bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety, and depression?Silence and shame must be transformed into open dialogue.

Guest:

Stephen P. Hinshaw, PhD, is a professor of psychology at UC Berkeley and a professor of psychiatry at UC San Francisco. He is the author of twelve books, and his book, Another Kind of Madness, A journey Through the Stigma and Hope of Mental Illness, has just been released. His research efforts in clinical and developmental psychology have received numerous international awards.

“Another Kind of Madness is one of the best books I’ve read about the cost of stigma and silence in a family touched by mental illness. I was profoundly moved by Hinshaw’s story written beautifully, from the inside out. It’s a masterpiece.”

—Glenn Close

Kidney Disease And The Choices People Make

Listen now to KPFA.org, 94.1FM. This show was aired on July 17, 2017 https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=264251

Dr. Vanessa Grubbs and Robert Phillips talked with us about kidney disease, dialysis, the long wait for transplants, and inequities in care. In Dr. Grubbs new book, “Hundreds of Interlaced Fingers,” she describes her journey to donate a kidney to the man she fell in love with and then married (Robert).

Guests

Dr. Vanessa Grubbs, MD, is an associate professor of medicine and nephrology at the University of California, San Francisco, and maintains a clinical practice and research program at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. She also teaches writing for patient advocacy to medical students and practicing physicians.

Robert Phillips is the President and CEO of Social Interest Solutions, a non-profit organization dedicated to improving access to quality health and social services through technology and policy solutions. Robert is an accomplished executive with nearly 25 years of experience working in political campaigns, health policy, health systems, technology, philanthropy, and strategic consulting. He and Vanessa are married.

 

The Brain, Memory, and Dementia

Listen now to todays show on About Health (June 26th) on @KPFA for a conversation about Dementia and the Brain.

 https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=262829

Dementia is an overall term that describes a wide range of symptoms associated with a decline in memory or other thinking skills, severe enough to reduce a person’s ability to perform everyday activities. Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60 to 80 percent of cases. Vascular dementia, which occurs after a stroke, is the second most common dementia type. But there are many other conditions that can cause symptoms of dementia. 

For local information on dementia care: http://daybreakcenters.org/

 

Josh Kornbluth, is currently engaged in a year-long residency as a scholar at the Global Brain Health Institute. He is spending his time with people who have dementia and their caregivers, as well as researchers, nurses, social workers, and others.  
Described as a cross between Woody Allen and Spalding Gray, Josh Kornbluth has been performing autobiographical one-man shows since 1987.  The San Francisco Chronicle declared, “Kornbluth takes a world we ignore, or barely observe, and brings it into brilliant comic relief.” He launched his career as a solo artist with Josh Kornbluth’s Daily World, in which he described his childhood as the son of communists in 1960s New York. He is currently working on a solo show based on his experiences as an artist-in-residence and volunteer at the Zen Hospice Project in San Francisco. For two years he hosted an interview program, “The Josh Kornbluth Show,” on KQED TV. His latest feature film, Love & Taxes, is his second in collaboration with his brother Jacob; in a review, Variety called him “a nerd for our time.” His first feature film, Haiku Tunnel, is currently on HBO. Check out his web site at http://joshkornbluth.com/
Dr. Jennifer Yokoyama is an Assistant Professor at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, where she is building an independent research program in neurogenetics of aging. More specifically, she is interested in how genomic variation influences brain anatomy, physiology, and cognitive behaviors in healthy older adults, and how genomic variation relates to vulnerability, as well as resilience, against neurodegenerative processes of aging. Dr. Yokoyama obtained her doctorate degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacogenomics in 2010 at UCSF and completed her postdoctoral training in neuroimaging at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center.

The unhealthy cycle of high stress and the pressured pace of modern life

Do you recognize how the pressures of life impacts your health and relationships? And do you have ways to decompress?

Many people go at a fast pace, eat on the run, work long hours, and are sleep deprived on a regular basis. Without taking time to tune in to what you’re feeling and what your body needs, you may not realize that you are regularly depleted.  Some people get sick, irritable, anxious, or become dependent on substances like caffeine, pain pills, and the internet.

On Monday, June 19th from 2-3PM, on KPFA.org, 94.1FM. My guest Peter Wright discussed the fast-paced lives most people live, and it’s effect on well-being and health.

Listen Now https://archives.kpfa.org/data/20170619-Mon1400.mp3

Guest: 

Peter Wright, MFT, is a Somatic Psychotherapist in private practice in Berkeley and San  Francisco. He is also Adjunct Faculty in the Somatics program at the California Institute for Integral Studies (CIIS), Clinical Supervisor for the Center for Somatic Psychotherapy in San Francisco, and a consultant to clinicians and social service agencies throughout the Bay Area.  Many years of personal and professional studies with the founder of Formative Psychology®, Stanley Keleman, has deepened his understanding of Formative Principles, providing the primary frame for his work.  Peter has practiced the art of Aikido for over 20 years, a practice that informs his understanding of  transition, growth, and relationships.

 

Research Into Using Psychoactive Substances For Psychosocial Distress

Is it possible to use psychoactive substances in a clinical setting for anxiety or depression related to a terminal illness, or to treat Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)?

LISTEN NOW: https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=260947 

Our show aired on 5/29/17 on KPFA.org.

Psilocybin (active ingredient in “magic mushrooms”)  is a powerful medicine that is being researched in therapeutic settings. Researches caution against recreational use of psilocybin because of potential adverse psychological reactions.  New research suggests it has great potential as a treatment for severe anxiety caused by a serious illness,  or terminal diagnosis. Other psychoactive substances are being researched for PTSD, depression, and drug abuse.

Guests:

Adam Strauss is a writer and performer based in New York City. His show, The Mushroom Cure, is playing at the Marsh Theatre in San Francisco for its West Coast Premiere. His show is inspired by a scientific study showing that hallucinogenic mushrooms may cure obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Adam won the Leffe Craft Your Character Storytelling Competition and the New York Fringe Festival’s Overall Excellence Award for Solo Performance. He is also a stand-up comedian who performs throughout the US and the UK. Adam received his BA in psychology from Brown University. For more information about the show go to https://themarsh.org

Alicia Danforth, Ph.D. has worked in clinical research with psychedelic medicines since 2004 at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. She has collaborated with Dr. Charles Grob on pilot studies of psilocybin-assisted therapy for existential anxiety reactive to late-stage cancer and MDMA-assisted therapy for social anxiety in autistic adults. She currently is a licensed psychologist in private practice in the Silicon Valley and is beginning new research on psilocybin-assisted therapy for long-term survivors of HIV in San Francisco. Alicia co-taught the first graduate course for clinicians and researchers in training, entitled, “Psychedelics: Theory, Research, and Clinical Applications.”

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I'm thrilled to offer my book to parents, teachers, therapists, and anyone who cares for and about children. If you would like to set up a presentation or training for your child's school, or your work place, contact me at rona@nurserona.com.

Is That Me Yelling? is available in most bookstores and at Amazon

"Engaging and practical, humorous and evidence-based, prescriptive but not preachy, authoritative yet never stuffy, Is That Me Yelling? quickly rises to the top of the many parenting books I've ever read. Rona Renner provides thoughtful and achievable solutions. If you're a parent who has ever yelled at your kid and wished you hadn't, this book is for you."
Stephen P. Hinshaw, PhD, professor in the department of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley; and vice-chair of psychology at the University of California, S.F.

"Is That Me Yelling? is a complete and compassionate companion for every parent​ and ​educator​. ​With excellent examples from her extensive professional and personal experience, nurse Rona illustrates fundamental psychological principles and functional parenting practices with empathy and enthusiasm."
Marisol Muñoz-Kiehne, PhD, clinical psychologist, parent educator, radio host, and author.

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Tantrums, Fussing, and Whining download PDF (English)