The Embodied Mind

The Embodied Mind shows us that the mind is not constrained to the brain. Our mind relies on all of the cells in our body…it’s more like a network than one specific location. And what does epigenetics teach us about our environment and the part it plays regarding our health and happiness?

Listen now to About Health, KPFA.org, 94.1 FM—9/13/21

**https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=363857**

“Genes don’t make us who we are. Gene expression does. And gene expression varies depending on the life we live. In other words, the food we eat, the water we drink, the air we breathe, our interpersonal relationships, and our relationship to ourselves – they all affect us on a deep biological level which in turn affects our minds. Recent discoveries in epigenetics have made it abundantly clear how nature (genes) and nurture (the environment) work in concert. It is not one or the other that is responsible for a disease or personality trait. The only thing we know for sure is that we are the product of a dynamic interaction between these forces and that nothing about us is written in stone.“—Dr. Thomas Verny

Thomas R. Verny is a clinical psychiatrist, academic, and author of eight of books and 47 scientific papers, including The Secret Life of the Unborn Child, which was published in 27 countries. His most recent book, The Embodied Mind,  will be available on 10/5/21.  He has participated in more than 250 newspaper, radio and TV interviews, including appearances with Donahue, Merv Griffin, Oprah, Sally Jessy Raphael, Barbara Walters, and Unsolved Mysteries—these interviews are available at trvernymd.com. He has taught at Harvard University, University of Toronto, York University (Toronto), and St. Mary’s University of Minnesota. Thomas lives with his wife in Ontario, Canada.

 

Family Medicine During The Pandemic

Listen now!  KPFA.org—94.1FM, 8/30/21

**https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=363073**

Have you been putting off going to your doctor for routine care because of Covid-19? Do you have questions about the vaccines or other medical issues. The doctor is in. 

Guest:

Dr. Hiten Patel is a  family medicine doctor at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center where he provides care to patients of all ages and across all care settings. He has special interest in disease prevention and telemedicine. He has a passion for the use of technology in health care and how technology can improve the health of communities.
He was the Chief Resident at Ohio State University Family Medicine Program and has been a Gold Humanism in Medicine Honor Society Member since 2017.

Troubling Times: A Deep Look Towards Hope And Health

These past years have brought to light so many questions to consider about our health, our countries health, and the health of our world. From the pandemic, to the insurrection, to our climate emergency—many of us have deep questions about what this unique time is teaching us and how we can survive as a species.

Listen now https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=362113

94.1FM, KPFA.org—About Health

As seen on a Sussex Directories Inc site

Dr. Ariane Eroy is a psychodynamic and transpersonal psychologist who has spent 25 years working in community mental health clinics. (Her academic research focused on prisoner re-entry.) Her understanding is not merely informed by psychoanalytic psychology, politics, and the environment but also yoga, the works of Gurdjieff and Ouspensky’s Fourth Way, Alice Bailey’s Theosophy, the writings of Benjamin Creme, and the Masters of Wisdom on Esoteric Christianity.

She believes that modern psychology needs to foster diverse kinds of healing, and promote each individual’s evolutionary trajectory, as well as explore the psychological meaning underpinning social change. 

Dr. Eroy maintains that the symbolic nature of events provides us with essential keys to our times.  These keys can fortify us, while clarifying what is ours to do– especially in light of the the Climate Emergency, and as more and more people strategically work towards establishing peace, justice, and sharing moving forward.

Culture, Care, and Covid

How can we address the ills of people who have been, and continue to be, struggling with the emotional and physical distress in this time of Covid?

There is a shortage of mental health professionals, especially in immigrant communities and communities of color. There is also suspicion of the Covid vaccine, sometimes based on medical racism and mistrust.

Join us to hear of some of the innovative programs that are being developed with community health workers, known as Promotores. The grassroots approach to building community capacity engages Promotores, strengthening their leadership skills as they connect people to needed services, and resources.

**Listen now to the show on August 2, 2021 on KPFA.org radio, 94.1FM**

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=361359

Guest: 

Dr. Jorge Partida PsyD, is a clinical and research psychologist, specializing in addiction and trauma. He is an author, consultant, and national speaker integrating Native Ancestral Teachings with traditional Western psychotherapy. Born in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, Dr. Partida immigrated to Chicago at nine years of age and there, obtained his Bachelors Degree in Clinical Psychology from Loyola University and his PsyD from The Illinois School of Professional’ Psychology. Dr. Jorge has been a consultant on many national and international projects designing and implementing clinical programs to address addiction, education, health, community building, diversity and spirituality. He has worked with local and national governments to coordinate services for those most impacted by poverty, war, and displacement. He has worked in Liberia, Africa in the repatriation of boy soldiers, forming “intentional communities” in war and poverty-impacted countries such as Colombia, Peru, and Mexico. Dr. Jorge has served as Director of Substance Abuse and Deputy Director of Behavioral Health for San Francisco’s Department of Public Health. He was also Director of the PsyD Program at John F. Kennedy University. Most recently Dr. Jorge served as Clinical Director and Director of Family Treatment for Alo Recovery Centers in Malibu, CA. Dr. Jorge is the author of “The Promise of The Fifth Sun” and “A Week of Awakening.” (Both titles are also written in Spanish) His writing integrates psychology with native healing traditions creating a client centered, participatory approach to health and wellness. For more than 20 years, Dr. Jorge has presented mental health segments on television and radio with networks, including Univision, Telemundo, HITN-TV in Spanish and CBS, UPN, NBC and PBS in English.

How the Culture of Medicine Kills Doctors and Patients

Are you getting the medical care you hoped for? Perhaps you really like your doctor and feel listened to and well treated. Or maybe you’re frustrated with the lack of coordinated medical care, unconscious bias, and medical systems that don’t keep patients well-being at the center of their decisions. Most people agree that the US health care system is broken, but there is also a less talked about problem to address— “physician culture.” My guest, Dr. Robert Pearl, says, “Doctors are not heroes or villains. They produce remarkable successes and abysmal failures.” We’ll discuss what doctors do well, and how some miss the mark on compassionate, science based, high quality, and effective medicine for all.

**Listen now to About Health on KPFA.org—94.1FM, (7/12/21)**

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=360279

 

ROBERT PEARL, M.D. is the former CEO of The Permanente Medical Group (1999-2017), the nation’s largest medical group, and former president of The Mid-Atlantic Permanente Medical Group (2009-2017). In these roles he led 10,000 physicians, 38,000 staff and was responsible for the nationally recognized medical care of 5 million Kaiser Permanente members. Named one of Modern Healthcare’s 50 most influential physician leaders, he is an advocate for the power of integrated, prepaid, technologically advanced and physician-led healthcare delivery. He serves as a clinical professor of plastic surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine and is on the faculty of the Stanford Graduate School of Business, where he teaches courses on strategy and leadership, and lectures on information technology and health care policy. Board certified in plastic and reconstructive surgery, Dr. Pearl received his medical degree from the Yale University School of Medicine, followed by a residency in plastic and reconstructive surgery at Stanford University.

He is the author of Mistreated: Why We think We’re Getting Good Healthcare—And Why We’re Usually Wrong,and his most recent book is, Uncaring: How the Culture of Medicine Kills Doctors and Patients. All proceeds from the book go to Doctors Without Borders.

Dr. Pearl hosts the podcasts Fixing Healthcare and Coronavirus: The Truth and he publishes a newsletter, Monthly Musings on American Healthcare. He has published more than 100 articles in medical journals and contributed to numerous books. From 2012 to 2017, Dr. Pearl served as chairman of the Council of Accountable Physician Practices (CAPP), which includes the nation’s largest and best multispecialty medical groups, and participated in the Bipartisan Congressional Task Force on Delivery System Reform and Health IT in Washington, D.C. Connect with Dr. Robert Pearl on Twitter @RobertPearlMDLinkedIn, and at his website robertpearlmd.com

A Personal Battle Against Alzheimer’s Disease

Listen now on About Health on KPFA radio— 94.1FM  (6/28/21)

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=359452

Alzheimer’s, which is a neurological disorder, affects 6.2 million Americans. “Worldwide, around 50 million people have dementia, and there are nearly 10 million new cases every year. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and may contribute to 60–70% of cases.” —World Health Organization.

There is no cure for Alzheimer’s, but there is extensive clinical research being done. The pathological changes in a person’s brain start ten to twenty years before there is cognitive impairment…and so it’s vital that life style changes begin before typical symptoms show up. My guest, Dr. Daniel Gibbs, has been devoting his time to raising awareness about early-stage Alzheimer’s, and what people can do about it, in order to live a meaningful life for a longer time.

Guest

Dr. Daniel Gibbs is a retired neurologist in Portland Oregon, with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease. Having spent twenty-five years caring for patients, many with dementia themselves, he is now an active advocate for the early recognition and management of Alzheimer’s. He is the author, along with Teresa H. Barker, of the recently released book “A Tattoo on my Brain. A Neurologist’s Personal Battle against Alzheimer’s Disease”

Breakthrough Treatment: Psilocybin-Assisted Psychotherapy

**Listen now to About Health, (6/14/21) KPFA radio—94.1FM**

 https://kpfa.org/episode/about-health-june-14-2021/

We discussed the research and best practices in psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy. This is being explored as a promising treatment for people with depression, OCD, anxiety, addiction and other mental health challenges. “Magic Mushrooms” have been used by many cultures since ancient times for medicinal and spiritual purposes. It is believed by some that taking psilocybin in a therapeutic setting can result in neuroplastic changes that can lead to improvement in mental health.

Guest:

James Keim, LCSW, is the founder of Mimosa Therapeutics, Inc., which uses bioreactors to grow research grade, natural psilocybin and other entheogens.  He is a trauma and psychedelic therapist and is co-author of the book, The Violence of Men, and a contributor of chapters to over 10 edited books on psychotherapy. He has served as a Fulbright Specialist in Southeast Asia where he provided training to clinicians that treat victims of human trafficking. James heads the Institute for the Advancement of Psychotherapy’s Oppositional and Conduct Disorder Clinic.

Epigenetics: Creating Optimal Health

Listen now to the 5/3/21 show on KPFA.org—94.1FM

**https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=356073**

Epigenetics is the study of how our lifestyle, behaviors, and the environment we live in can cause changes that affect the way our genes work. It used to be thought that our DNA rigidly determines our health, but scientists have confirmed that the vast majority of our genes are actually fluid and dynamic. Our gene expression is a powerful part of our overall health, and the more you understand this complex topic the more empowered you will be to influence your health and longevity.

Guest

Dr. Kenneth R. Pelletier, PhD, MD is a clinical professor of medicine at the UCSF School of Medicine and former clinical professor of medicine at the Stanford School of Medicine. He is also Chairman of the American Health Association and is a vice president with American Specialty Health. At the UCSF School of Medicine, he is the Director of the Corporate Health Improvement Program (CHIP), a research program between CHIP and fifteen Fortune 500 corporations. Dr. Pelletier has authored numerous books (over 13) including international bestseller, Mind as Healer, Mind as Slayer, and his 2018 book, Change Your Genes Change Your Life. He is a peer reviewer for several medical journals including the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and serves on a number of corporate boards. He has published over 300 professional articles and has appeared on ABC, CBS, CNN, NBC, and the BBC to discuss his research.

To learn more and get a free copy of his book, Change Your Genes Change Your Life, go to https://drpelletier.com.

 

 

Complexities of Parenting

When it comes to parenting approaches, one size does not fit all. There are many factors that influence how you raise your child based on things like temperament, parenting style, culture, and family and social influences. There are many different styles and methods of parenting, and if you get confused about what your child or grandchild needs, you’re not alone.

Listen now to KPFA.org 94.1FM (4/19/21)

** https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=355287 **

My guest on About Health, Dr. David Rettew, will join me to discuss topics such as screen time, eating habits, discipline, and the benefits and challenges of different parenting styles such as “helicopter” versus “old school” parenting. There are a lot of questions facing parents of young children, but  understanding more about your child’s temperament and yours will guide you through the different stages of childhood.

Guest: David Rettew, MD is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine. Dr. Rettew has over 100 published journal articles, chapters, and scientific abstracts on a variety of child mental health topics, including a 2013 book entitled Child Temperament:  New Thinking About the Boundary Between Traits and Illness.  He also writes a blog for Psychology Today called, “The ABCs of Child Psychiatry.”   His newest book is called Parenting Made Complicated: What Science Really Knows about the Greatest Debates of Early Parenting. You can follow him on Twitter and Facebook @PediPsych.

Staying Healthy During The Pandemic

It’s over a year now since we began to adjust to the many challenges of the Covid-19 pandemic. How are you doing?  And what questions do you have about staying healthy as things are opening up and more and more people are getting vaccinated? Let’s talk about how to keep your health and well being front and center as we start to enjoy some of the things we’ve missed so dearly.

Listen now to KPFA.org, 94.1FM, 4/5/21

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=354359

GUEST

Harry McIlroy, MD, is an integrative physician certified with the Institute for Functional Medicine. Before medical school and completion of residency at Contra Costa Regional Medical Center, he had a background in nutrition and obtained a Master’s degree in acupuncture and Chinese medicine. Dr. Harry strives to provide patients with health tools that empower them to improve their well being. Some of his specialities include Medical Cannabis, Chronic Pain, Digestive HealthRegenerative Medicine, and Insomnia. He serves as a volunteer clinical faculty member for the UCSF Medical School, and mentors and teaches medical residents at the Contra Costa Regional Medical Center, which provides medical care to underserved populations. He has recently joined BioReset Medical where he continues his focus on treating chronic disease with Functional and Regenerative medicine.

If you want to hear the previous show I did (April 2020) with Dr. Harry McIlroy, you can listen here for many good tips on health:  https://www.nurserona.com/staying-healthy-during-covid-19/

 

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I'm thrilled to offer my book to parents, teachers, therapists, and anyone who cares for and about children. If you would like to set up a presentation or training for your child's school, or your work place, contact me at rona@nurserona.com.

Is That Me Yelling? is available in most bookstores and at Amazon

"Engaging and practical, humorous and evidence-based, prescriptive but not preachy, authoritative yet never stuffy, Is That Me Yelling? quickly rises to the top of the many parenting books I've ever read. Rona Renner provides thoughtful and achievable solutions. If you're a parent who has ever yelled at your kid and wished you hadn't, this book is for you."
Stephen P. Hinshaw, PhD, professor in the department of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley; and vice-chair of psychology at the University of California, S.F.

"Is That Me Yelling? is a complete and compassionate companion for every parent​ and ​educator​. ​With excellent examples from her extensive professional and personal experience, nurse Rona illustrates fundamental psychological principles and functional parenting practices with empathy and enthusiasm."
Marisol Muñoz-Kiehne, PhD, clinical psychologist, parent educator, radio host, and author.

Tips

Setting Limits with a Timer download PDF (English)