Eating Disorders During Adolescence

Listen Now: https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=369151

About Health, 12/6/21—KPFA.org—94.1FM 

35-57% of adolescent girls engage in crash dieting, fasting, self-induced vomiting, diet pills, or laxatives. Disordered eating also occurs in boys, but at a lower rate. Parents are often at a loss as to how to talk to their teens about their eating behaviors, especially when their child says that everything is fine.  Finding quality treatment is difficult, especially now during the pandemic when rates of eating disorders are even higher than before, and clinics have long waiting lists. Stigma and shame continue to be factors that slow down diagnosis and treatment, and can lead to serious medical problems.

Treatment and recovery is possible! Join me and my guest Dr. Sara Buckelew to learn more.

Dr. Sara M. Buckelew is a pediatrician and specialist in adolescent medicine. She is Medical Director of the UCSF Eating Disorders Program and the Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine Clinic at UCSF. Her focus is on caring for teenagers with eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa and bulimia. She is also involved in medical education at UCSF’s School of Medicine.

Dr. Buckelew earned her medical degree from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. She completed a residency in pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and earned a master of public health degree from the University of California, Berkeley. At UCSF, she completed a residency in preventive medicine and public health, followed by a fellowship in adolescent medicine. She is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Pediatric Society and Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine.

If you missed the 11/22/21 show with Elizabeth Scott LCSW, CEDS-S, you can listen now. 

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=368367

Eating, Embodiment, and Health

Health experts who treat eating disorders report an increase in the number of people who are reaching out for help during the Covid-19 pandemic. There are waiting lists at treatment centers across the county, and over the course of the pandemic, the National Eating Disorder Association helpline has reported a 40% increase in call volume.

“It’s estimated that 30 million Americans have struggled with an eating disorder at some point over their lifetime. That breaks down to 20 million women and 10 million men.” —National Eating Disorders Association

Join me and my guest Elizabeth Scott, to discusses the difference between the terms “body image” and “embodiment.” We will explore the many factors that can lead to an eating disorder and why treatment is vital to a person’s health and wellbeing.

**Listen now to About Health show (11/22/21) on KPFA.org—94.1FM**

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=368367

Guest:

Elizabeth Scott, LCSW, CEDS-S, is an educator and psychotherapist whose work focuses on the intersection of embodiment, social justice, and mindfulness. As Co-Founder and Director of Training for The Body Positive, Elizabeth instructs treatment professionals, educators, and students to use the Be Body Positive Model to end eating disorders and promote joyful embodiment. Elizabeth is a Certified Eating Disorders Specialist and IAEDP(TM) Approved Supervisor (CEDS-S). She studies Insight Meditation and has a private practice in the San Francisco Bay Area.

 

 National Eating Disorders Association Helpline (800) 931-2237

Monday—Thursday 11am—9pm ET

Friday 11am—5pm ET

Translation services are available on the phone.

Rethinking Suicide: How we can do better

“In an average day, 17 veterans die by suicide — not in a far-off place, but right here at home. Two service members die by suicide every day of the year. They’re our daughters. Our sons. Parents. Spouses. Siblings. Beloved friends and battle buddies… Each of these precious lives leaves behind loved ones who feel their absence every single day, like a black hole in the middle of their chests.” —President Biden, CNN 11/2/21

 Suicide is a major public health issue and among the top ten causes of death in the United States. More veterans die by suicide than in combat.

My guest discussed why it’s important to rethink our approach to suicide prevention and consider what is being done wrong since rates continue to rise. It’s time to reduce the stigma and blame around suicide and rethink how we can change things as a society instead of only seeing death by suicide as the result of a mental illness.

Listen Now to About Health—KPFA.org, 94.1FM (11/8/21)

*https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=367506*

 

Guest: Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPP, is a board-certified clinical psychologist and the Stress, Trauma, and Resilience (STAR) Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. He is the author of “Rethinking Suicide, Why Prevention Fails, and How We Can Do Better. His research on suicide has led to the development and refinement of interventions that significantly reduce suicidal behaviors, and has been featured in major media outlets including Scientific American, CNN, Fox News, NPR, USA Today, New York Times, and the Washington Post. Dr. Bryan has published hundreds of scientific articles and multiple books, and has received numerous awards and recognitions for this work.

24 hour National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 800-273-8255

(Languages: English, Spanish) 

The Doctor Is In: Covid, Flu, and Your Health Questions

Listen now for the show we did on 10/25/21 on About Health—KPFA.org 94.1FM

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=366388

Harry McIlroy, MD is an integrative physician certified with the Institute for Functional Medicine. He has a background in nutrition and holds a Master’s degree in acupuncture and Chinese medicine. He is the Clinical Director of BioReset Medical’s San Francisco office. He has practiced integrative medicine for over 25 years and is a leading expert in nutritional and plant based medicines, including medical cannabis. He continues his focus on treating chronic disease with Functional and Regenerative medicine and Dr. Harry strives to provide patients with health tools that empower them to improve their well being.

Diet for a Small Planet: 50th Anniversary

Listen now to About Health on KPFA.org, 94.1FM—10/11/21

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=365451

Join this dynamic mother and daughter team who have been working tirelessly to show that “Plant-centered eating can help restore our damaged ecology, address the climate crisis, and move us toward real democracy.” We talked about how changing yourself and the world can start with changing the way we eat.

“Without changing our diets, agriculture alone could make it impossible to stay within the greenhouse gas essential limit of 1.5 degrees centigrade.” —small planet institute.

Frances Moore Lappé is the author or coauthor of twenty books, including the three-million copy Diet for a Small Planet, and just published is this book’s 50th updated anniversary edition. The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History describes Diet for a Small Planet as “one of the most influential political tracts of the times.Frances is co-founder of Oakland-based Food First and the Cambridge-based Small Planet Institute, which she leads with her daughter Ana Lappé. The recipient of twenty honorary degrees, Frances has been a visiting scholar at MIT and U.C. Berkeley and in 1987 received the Right Livelihood Award, often called the “Alternative Nobel.” New York Magazine dubbed her “Movement Mother” and Gourmet Magazine named her as one of 25 people—from Thomas Jefferson to Julia Child—whose work has changed the way America eats. She is a founding member of the World Future Council and serves on the National Advisory Board of the Union of Concerned Scientists. Frances is co-founder of three national organizations—Oakland-based Food First, the Center for Living Democracy, and her current home, the Cambridge-based Small Planet Institute, cofounded with her daughter Anna, and where her son Anthony Lappé, is Media Advisor.

Anna Lappé, Co-founder of Small Planet Institute, is a national bestselling author, a respected advocate for sustainability and justice along the food chain, and an advisor to funders investing in food system transformation. She leads Real Food Media, based at Corporate Accountability International, which she founded to bring together leading food and farm organizations to produce powerful communications initiatives to inspire, educate and grow the movement for sustainable food and farming. Her most recent book is Diet for a Hot Planet: The Climate Crisis at the End of Your Fork and What You Can Do About It. She also helped edit the recipe section of the new, 50th anniversary edition of her mother’s book, Diet for a Small Planet. A James Beard Leadership Awardee, Anna is the co-author or author of three books on food, farming, and sustainability and the contributing author to thirteen more. In more than two decades of organizing, Anna has helped direct millions of dollars to advocate for food justice and sustainability around the country and the world. Anna’s research on food systems has taken her to more than 25 countries and 100 US cities. In addition to her philanthropy through the Small Planet Fund, Anna is the director of the Food & Democracy program of the Panta Rhea Foundation and is an active participant of several funder collaboratives building more just and sustainable food systems worldwide.

The Embodied Mind

The Embodied Mind shows us that the mind is not constrained to the brain. Our mind relies on all of the cells in our body…it’s more like a network than one specific location. And what does epigenetics teach us about our environment and the part it plays regarding our health and happiness?

Listen now to About Health, KPFA.org, 94.1 FM—9/13/21

**https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=363857**

“Genes don’t make us who we are. Gene expression does. And gene expression varies depending on the life we live. In other words, the food we eat, the water we drink, the air we breathe, our interpersonal relationships, and our relationship to ourselves – they all affect us on a deep biological level which in turn affects our minds. Recent discoveries in epigenetics have made it abundantly clear how nature (genes) and nurture (the environment) work in concert. It is not one or the other that is responsible for a disease or personality trait. The only thing we know for sure is that we are the product of a dynamic interaction between these forces and that nothing about us is written in stone.“—Dr. Thomas Verny

Thomas R. Verny is a clinical psychiatrist, academic, and author of eight of books and 47 scientific papers, including The Secret Life of the Unborn Child, which was published in 27 countries. His most recent book, The Embodied Mind,  will be available on 10/5/21.  He has participated in more than 250 newspaper, radio and TV interviews, including appearances with Donahue, Merv Griffin, Oprah, Sally Jessy Raphael, Barbara Walters, and Unsolved Mysteries—these interviews are available at trvernymd.com. He has taught at Harvard University, University of Toronto, York University (Toronto), and St. Mary’s University of Minnesota. Thomas lives with his wife in Ontario, Canada.