• Rona Renner,
    Rona Renner, "Is that Me Yelling?"
  • Managing the Anxiety of Parenting Teens
    Managing the Anxiety of Parenting Teens
  • How To Be A Good Parent On A Budget
    How To Be A Good Parent On A Budget
  • The View From The Bay - Discussing men's and women's communication
    The View From The Bay - Discussing men's and women's communication
  • AVG - The Digital Playground
    AVG - The Digital Playground
  • AVG Digital Diaries Episode 2: Digital Birth
    AVG Digital Diaries Episode 2: Digital Birth
  • AVG Digital Diaries Episode 3: Internet Safety for Six to Nine-Year-Olds
    AVG Digital Diaries Episode 3: Internet Safety for Six to Nine-Year-Olds
  • Shelly Rivoli with Rona Renner on The View from the Bay
    Shelly Rivoli with Rona Renner on The View from the Bay
  • Blossoming Mom Series (PART ONE)
    Blossoming Mom Series (PART ONE)
  • Blossoming Mom Series (PART TWO)
    Blossoming Mom Series (PART TWO)
  • Blossoming Moms Series (PART THREE)
    Blossoming Moms Series (PART THREE)
  • Blossoming Moms Series (PART FOUR)
    Blossoming Moms Series (PART FOUR)

Prescribing Nature For Health

People experience therapeutic benefits when immersed in nature. Research shows that spending significant time in nature can lead to better immunity, reduced anger, better mood, good sleep, and increased energy. Spending time in nature also reduces blood pressure, heart rate, muscle tension, and the production of stress hormones.

In partnership with the East Bay Regional Park District, the Primary Care Clinic at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland became one of the first in the nation to refer patients to the outdoors for health. The program is called Stay Healthy In Nature Everyday (SHINE). There are now many

Sleep! Why It’s Important And How To Get It

Listen now to  KPFA 94.1FM “About Health” 10/15/18

 

If you’re having trouble sleeping, you’re not alone. About 25 percent of Americans experience acute insomnia each year. Good sleep is essential for your physical and emotional health, and a first step in getting a good night sleep is to learn about what helps and what hinders sleep.

Guests:

Michael A. Tompkins, PhD, has twenty years of providing cognitive-behavior therapy for anxiety disorders and chronic insomnia. He is a licensed psychologist and co-director of the San Francisco Bay Area Center for Cognitive Therapy. He specializes in the treatment of anxiety disorders and insomnia, and is the author of seven books, including, Anxiety and Avoidance: A Universal Treatment for Anxiety, Panic, and Fear, OCD a guide for the newly diagnosed, and his newest book is, The Insomnia Workbook for Teens. He is also an assistant clinical professor of psychology, at the University of California at Berkeley, and an adjunct faculty member of the Beck Institute.

Monique A. Thompson, PsyD, is a clinical psychologist specializing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for mood and anxiety disorders. She treats adults and teens with depression, anxiety (panic, worry, phobias), social anxiety, ADHD, insomnia, and life stress. In addition to her practice at the San Francisco Bay Area Center for Cognitive Therapy, she was a staff psychologist at the Golden Bear Mood and Sleep Research Clinic at UC Berkeley. She has extensive training in CBT for insomnia (CBT-I). She also has experience working with individuals and families coping with addiction, role transitions, and chronic health problems (multiple sclerosis, lupus, cancer, chronic pain).

Living With Chronic Pain

Listen now to the show we did on 9/17/18,  on About Health on KPFA.org, 94.1FM

 https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=294222

If you suffer from chronic pain, you are not alone. It’s been reported that 100 million people in the US suffer from chronic pain, and 66% of sufferers expect to live with some pain for the rest of their lives. Many people with chronic pain feel isolated, and need friends, family, or counselors, to help them cope with the many emotions that come with ongoing pain. Aside from medication treatment, there are many other strategies people find helpful in managing their pain, and we will talk with our listeners about what has helped them. We will also discuss the stigma associated with people who have chronic pain, and what kinds of things can relieve that burden.

Guests:

Marsha Haller, MD did her residency training at San Francisco General Hospital/UCSF in Psychiatry and Family Medicine. She also completed a fellowship in Urban Family Health, and the Geriatric Teaching Program at Mt Sinai Hospital.  Dr. Haller was board certified in Geriatric Medicine in 1990.  During her academic career, she developed courses on cross-cultural and psychosocial aspects of family medicine, and geriatric psychopharmacology. For 12 years she worked at the Alameda Family Physicians, where she treated adults and children. During this time, she developed particular interest in chronic myofascial pain, and deepened her commitment to a more holistic approach to health and healing. In 2004 she became a Diplomate of the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture. For the last 16 years, her Berkeley practice has been devoted to medical acupuncture and related techniques. She is committed to fostering lifestyle changes that lead to better individual and global health. She also works for the San Francisco Department of Public Health at Tom Waddell Health Center in the Tenderloin doing urgent care.

Jennifer Ault, D.O. is a former physical therapist who is currently board certified in Neurology and Pain Medicine. She graduated from Touro University College of osteopathic medicine in 2007 and completed her residency at Dartmouth medical school in New Hampshire. She has been with Sutter East Bay physicians medical group since September 2012. Dr. Ault specializes in the treatment of acute and chronic pain emanating from the nervous system. She provides multi-disciplinary care, including formulating medication recommendations if appropriate. She also recommends physical, complimentary, and behavioral treatments as appropriate. She provides full scope of interventional procedures in the treatment of these and other painful conditions. These include but are not limited to: epidural injections, spinal and peripheral lead stimulation, lumbar sympathetic blocks, stellate ganglion blocks, radiofrequency ablation, ultrasound guided nerve blocks and joint injections, lumbar facet and sacroiliac joint injections, and occipital and sphenopalatine nerve blockade.

Complexities of Suicide Risk

Listen now to the show we did on KPFA, 94.1FM, on About Health, 8/27/18 https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=292821

1-800-273-8255  National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. If you or someone you know is considering suicide, call this number. The Lifeline provides 24/7 free and confidential support for people in distress, and resources for you and your loved ones. 

My guests, Eli Merritt MD, and Esme Shaller, PhD, joined me to discuss the suffering and anguish that is associated with suicide. We addressed the grief, guilt, and shame people feel when someone they love has killed themselves, and also the pain and hopelessness that a person experiences when they are considering suicide. 

Talking about suicide is challenging, but it’s vital that we TALK ABOUT IT. 

Eli Merritt, M.D., is the founder of Merritt Mental Health, a mental health and addiction care navigation company that connects patients and family members with best-fit, individualized mental health care nationwide. He is the author of Suicide Risk in the Bay Area: A Guide for Families, Physicians, Therapists, and Other Professionals, and  is currently a Visiting Scholar at Vanderbilt University where he is investigating a Unified Theory of Depression. Dr Merritt has previously held positions as president of the San Francisco Psychiatric Society and as an Adjunct Clinical Faculty member at Stanford. He completed a B.A. in history at Yale, M.A. in ethics at Yale, medical degree at Case Western Reserve, medical internship at the Lahey Clinic, and residency in psychiatry at Stanford. He has written on diverse topics in medicine, psychiatry, and medical ethics, including diagnosis, insomnia and depression, addiction, suicide prevention, informed consent, and privacy issues in mental illness. He has taught medical students and resident physicians courses on psychiatric interviewing, ethical standards and boundary violations, the placebo effect, hyperthyroidism, and medical decision-making, among other subjects. 
 

Esme Shaller, Ph.D., is an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Child Psychiatry at UC San Francisco and in the Department of Psychology at UC Berkeley. She is the director of the Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program at UCSF and the Clinical Director of Outpatient Services for Child Psychiatry. Dr. Shaller’s passion lies in the teaching and dissemination of empirically supported treatments for complex psychological problems, particularly in adolescence. As such, she devotes a large percentage of her time to teaching and training, both within UCSF’s residency and fellowship programs and in the larger Bay Area community. She has worked with other members of her team to implement comprehensive DBT for low income teens in three California Counties. Dr. Shaller received her B.A. in psychology with highest honors from UC Berkeley and her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the State University of New York, Stony Brook. Subsequently, she completed her psychology internship at the Zucker Hillside Hospital at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in Queens (where she fell in love with DBT!), followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at Kaiser Permanente in South San Francisco. She has been at UCSF since 2007. 

What is DBT: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Stz–d17ID4&feature=youtu.be

The Consequences of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Through a Lifespan

Listen now to today’s show (8/20/18) on “About Health”  KPFA 94.1FM

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=292381

The ACE’s study is one of the largest investigations conducted to assess associations between childhood maltreatment and later-life health and well-being. The study is a collaboration between the Centers For Disease Control (CDC) and Kaiser Permanente’s Health Appraisal Clinic in San Diego.

How have the adverse experiences of your childhood impacted your physical and emotional health as an adult? Some steps in healing is understanding and untangling what happened, talking about the trauma, and learning resiliency skills. When a child is acting out in school, or an adult is abusing drugs or alcohol we can ask, “What happened to her, instead of what’s wrong with her.”

Guests:

Lisa Frederiksen is the author of hundreds of articles and 11 books, including “If You Loved Me, You’d Stop!,” “Addiction Recovery: What Helps, What Doesn’t,” and “Secondhand Drinking: the Phenomenon That Affects Millions.” She is a national keynote speaker with over 30 years speaking experience, consultant, and founder of BreakingTheCycles.com. She has spent more than 15 years studying 21st century brain research in order to write, speak, and consult on a range of brain-related topics, including: ACEs, toxic stress, trauma, substance use disorders, secondhand drinking, mental illness, brain development, and addiction treatment and recovery. Some of her consulting has been overseas in countries such as Kenya, Slovenia, and Mexico. Lisa is an active member of the ACEs Connection~Resilient Sac Community.

Wendie Skala, BSN, MS. When she first became a nurse she specialized in intensive care and emergency nursing. Wendie flew for Stanford Life Flight for 10 years and honed her skills in prehospital transport of critically injured patients. She joined the Air Force Reserve in 1999 and achieved the rank of Lt. Col. while serving 7 deployments overseas in support of OPERATION IRAQI AND ENDURING FREEDOM. Along with transporting wounded warriors, she assumed command and control roles and functioned as the Chief Nurse for air operations in Afghanistan, and she earned her Masters’ Degree in Military Science. In 2009, she took on the role as the Injury Prevention Coordinator for Kaiser Permanente’s first trauma center in South Sacramento. There she implemented the Sacramento Violence Intervention Program that provided services for shot, stabbed, and almost assaulted to death victims of violence along with her other work preventing motor vehicle crashes and older adult falls. Some of the programs she championed in the community included the Alternatives to Violence Program and Standing Up Resilient Sac, an ACEs Connection Collaborative. In her role at Kaiser Permanente, Wendie worked with law enforcement, schools, non-profits, and government agencies to educate about ACEs and Trauma Informed Care. She has presented nationally on the subject and is a contributing author and educator of the American Trauma Society’s Injury Prevention Course. Currently, Wendie is Adjunct Faculty at Samuel Merritt’s School of Nursing in Sacramento and continues to work with ACEs Connection and Resilient Sac.

Resources:

Get your ACEs score: https://acestoohigh.com/got-your-ace-score/

https://www.acesconnection.com/g/resource-center/collection/resource-list-topic-trauma-informed

https://acestoohigh.com

https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy/index.html

https://www.acesconnection.com/blog/the-developing-brain-and-adverse-childhood-experiences-aces

https://www.acesconnection.com/g/sacramento-county-ca-aces-connection/clip/tribute-to-dr-vincent-felitti-the-california-endowment

https://www.acesconnection.com/

Donna Jackson Nakazawa, author of ‘Childhood Disrupted: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcZ_uLIB7V8

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/03/02/387007941/take-the-ace-quiz-and-learn-what-it-does-and-doesnt-mean

Nadine Burke Harris, MD is the author of the book “the deepest well, Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity.

Consequences Of Toxic Pesticides In Our Food and Gut

Listen to todays show I hosted on KPFA, 94.1FM, “About Health” 7/23/18

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=290511

“Today, pesticide use is at an all-time high and these agrochemicals are finding their way into our livestock, agricultural industries, and ultimately, onto our plates.” —What’s Making Our Children Sick?

Did you know that Glyphosate herbicide has been found in popular cereals?

The Center for Environmental Health’s (CEH) independent testing of a variety of American cereals found many common brands of conventional products contained residue levels of the weed killer glyphosate. This toxic chemical has been shown to cause birth defects in laboratory animals and disrupt hormone function. Recently, the World Health Organization classified glyphosate as a “probable human carcinogen.”

Joining us for this important conversation is Carolyn CoxCaroline leads The Center for Environmental Health‘s (CEH) research on toxic exposures, identifying, analyzing, and substantiating the scientific bases to eliminate threats to children and others exposed to dangerous chemicals in consumer products. She joined CEH after working on pesticide toxicity and alternatives to their use for over 15 years, and serves on the Board of Directors of Beyond Pesticides. She is passionate about protecting our world from toxic chemicals. Caroline has a master’s degree in entomology from Oregon State University

Also joining us is Michelle Perro, MD, a veteran pediatrician with over thirty-five years of experience in acute and integrative medicine. More than ten years ago, Dr. Perro transformed her clinical practice to include pesticide and health advocacy. She has both directed and worked as attending physician from New York’s Metropolitan Hospital to UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland. Dr. Perro has managed her own business, Down to Earth Pediatrics. She is currently lecturing and consulting as well as working with Gordon Medical Associates, an integrative health center in Northern California. She is the co-author of “What’s Making our Children Sick?” 

You can also hear the show I did with co-author Vincanne Adams, PhD at http://www.nurserona.com/industrial-food-and-chronic-illness/

 

 

Trauma, Resilience, and Hope

David B. Feldman joined me on “About Health” on KPFA.org  for a discussion about people who experience physical trauma and the aftermath of their experience. Why do some people recover faster? And how can a person’s attitude, outlook, and social support, make a difference?

Listen now https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=286078 ( May 28, 2018)

David B. Feldman, PhD, is considered to be among the top experts on hope in the field of psychology.  Professor and Chair of the Department of Counseling Psychology at Santa Clara University, his research and writings have addressed such topics as hope, meaning, and growth in the face of serious medical illness, trauma, and other highly stressful circumstances. He is the co-author of three books, including The End-of-Life Handbook: A Compassionate Guide to Connecting with and Caring for a Dying Loved One, and Supersurvivors: The Surprising Link Between Suffering & Success.  His research has been published in numerous scientific journals as well as in popular publications.  He has appeared in such magazines as SELF, People, ‘O’: The Oprah Magazine, U.S. News & World Report, and Harvard Business Review, has been interviewed for national television and radio, and writes regularly for Psychology Today. In addition, he is the host of the podcast “Psychology in 10 Minutes,” which can be found at www.psychologyin10minutes.com or on any podcast app.  More information about Dr. Feldman can be found at www.davidfeldmanphd.com.

What is Palliative Care, And Who Benefits?

Listen to todays show on 94.1FM, KPFA.org (4/30/18) “About Health”

I was joined by David B. Feldman, PhD

 https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=284052

What happens when someone you care about is diagnosed with a serious illness? Do you know how to get the care needed, and how to have the difficult conversations about prognosis? There are many decisions to make, and medical professionals are often not trained to give the support that is needed.

Palliative care is whole-person care that relieves symptoms of a disease or disorder, whether or not it can be cured.

David B. Feldman, PhD, is considered to be among the top experts on hope in the field of psychology.  Professor and Chair of the Department of Counseling Psychology at Santa Clara University, his research and writings have addressed such topics as hope, meaning, and growth in the face of serious medical illness, trauma, and other highly stressful circumstances. He is the co-author of three books, including The End-of-Life Handbook: A Compassionate Guide to Connecting with and Caring for a Dying Loved One, and Supersurvivors: The Surprising Link Between Suffering & Success.  His research has been published in numerous scientific journals as well as in popular publications.  He has appeared in such magazines as SELF, People, ‘O’: The Oprah Magazine, U.S. News & World Report, and Harvard Business Review, has been interviewed for national television and radio, and writes regularly for Psychology Today. In addition, he is the host of the podcast “Psychology in 10 Minutes,” which can be found at www.psychologyin10minutes.com or on any podcast app.  More information about Dr. Feldman can be found at www.davidfeldmanphd.com.

Stressed Out? Try A Little Mindfulness!

Listen to today’s show (4/23/18)

  https://archives.kpfa.org/data/20180423-Mon1400.mp3

Chronic stress, due to challenges such as school pressures, relationships, trauma, money problems, or over-work, can take a toll on your body, mind, and behavior….sometimes much more than you would imagine.

Stress from the demands and pressures of everyday life can lead to harmful habits such as overeating, smoking, or drug and alcohol abuse….and can also cause acute or chronic illnesses.

Join us to discuss strategies and attitudes such as mindfulness, gratitude, and self-care, to reduce stress and enjoy life more.

Guests:

Gina M. Biegel, LMFT, is a psychotherapist, researcher, speaker, and author in the San Francisco Bay Area who specializes in mindfulness-based work with adolescents. She is founder of Stressed Teens, which has been offering mindfulness-based stress reduction for teens, families, schools, professionals, and the community for over a decade. She created this program to help teens in a large HMO’s outpatient department of child and adolescent psychiatry, whose physical and psychological symptoms were not responding satisfactorily to a multitude of other practices. She is the author of Be Mindful & Stress Less: 50 Ways to Deal with Your (Crazy) Life, The Stress Reduction Workbook for Teens, the Be Mindful Card Deck for Teens and the forthcoming book Mindfulness for Student Athletes: A Workbook to Help Teens Reduce Stress and Enhance Performance. Gina provides worldwide multi-day trainings and intensive ten-week online trainings, and she works with teens and families individually and in groups. For more information, visit her website at www.stressedteens.com. 

Leslie Rebecca (Reba) Connell, LCSW, offers health coaching and therapy and teaches Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction and Nourish Your Mood: Mindful Eating with the Brain in Mind, classes in Oakland, California. She is also a Certified Gottman Method Couples Therapist. Her integrative approach looks at mental health as something that occurs in a context…within our physical body, whose cellular, deep wellness supports our mind…within relationships and community.  She has completed several levels of study in teaching Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, including a professional training program under the direction of Dr. Saki Santorelli and Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn and a training in teaching Mindful Eating, through UCSD. She is deeply engaged with science-based and traditional approaches to healing through food and self-care. Her trainings include Food As Medicine; The Gut Brain; and Preventing and Managing Chronic Inflammation: Special Focus: Nutritional Interventions. She is committed to a feminist approach that honors all body shapes and sizes while collaborating in radiant wellness. You can find out more at http://www.centerforstressreduction.com

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I'm thrilled to offer my book to parents, teachers, therapists, and anyone who cares for and about children. If you would like to set up a presentation or training for your child's school, or your work place, contact me at rona@nurserona.com.

Is That Me Yelling? is available in most bookstores and at Amazon

"Engaging and practical, humorous and evidence-based, prescriptive but not preachy, authoritative yet never stuffy, Is That Me Yelling? quickly rises to the top of the many parenting books I've ever read. Rona Renner provides thoughtful and achievable solutions. If you're a parent who has ever yelled at your kid and wished you hadn't, this book is for you."
Stephen P. Hinshaw, PhD, professor in the department of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley; and vice-chair of psychology at the University of California, S.F.

"Is That Me Yelling? is a complete and compassionate companion for every parent​ and ​educator​. ​With excellent examples from her extensive professional and personal experience, nurse Rona illustrates fundamental psychological principles and functional parenting practices with empathy and enthusiasm."
Marisol Muñoz-Kiehne, PhD, clinical psychologist, parent educator, radio host, and author.

Tips

Self-Regulation: Tips for Parents download PDF (English)