It’s time for a Care Revolution

**Listen now to KPFA.org—94.1FM, (1/10/22)**

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=371217

What would it take to have a caring system that addressed health disparities, honored indigenous medicine, and respected the stories and struggles of all people? What are the systems and environmental factors that create conditions of illness? How can we create a culture of care for our children, elders, and the planet?  And, what could we be doing differently in this prolonged, confusing, and painful time of Covid-19?

Guest:

Dr. Rupa Marya  is a physician, activist, writer, mother, and a composer. She is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco and the founder and worker-director of the Deep Medicine Circle, a WOC-led organization committed to healing the wounds of colonialisim through food, medicine, story, restoration and learning. Her work sits at the nexus of climate, health and racial justice. She is the co-author with Raj Patel of the book Inflamed: Deep Medicine and the Anatomy of Injustice. Dr. Marya was appointed by Governor Newsom to and serves on the Healthy California for All Commission where she tirelessly advocates for Single Payer healthcare. She has toured twenty-nine countries with her band, Rupa and the April Fishes, whose music was described by the legend Gil Scott-Heron as “Liberation Music.” To learn more about her go to https://rupamarya.org

 

 

The Doctor Is In

Listen now to About Health on KPFA Radio—94.1FM, (10/26/20)

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=343939 

Dr. Michael Lenoir and I discussed current health issues, such as Covid 19, disparities in health care for black people, other people of color, and folks who are low income.  

Michael LeNoir, MD, is an allergist in the East Bay, board certified in both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, and served on the Board the American Association of Certified Allergist. He is also an associate clinical professor at UCSF, and for 20 years he was the Director of Allergy Services at San Francisco General Hospital. He has a special interest in asthma in the African American and high risk communities and genetic polymorphisms. He served as the President of the Northern California Allergy Association. From 1998 to 2000 Dr. Lenoir served as the chair of the National Medical Association’s Allergy and Asthma Section and was the recipient of the first Floyd Malveaux Award. Dr. Lenoir has served as the chairperson of the Underserved Committee of the American Academy of Allergy.

Dr. Lenoir served as the President of the National Association of Physician Broadcasters.  In 1994 and 2001, he received the Ken Alvord Distinguished Community Service Award from that organization. He was one of 50 physicians, nationwide, chosen to receive the Pfizer Positive Physician Award from the American Medical Association.  Additionally, in 1988, he was named the Oakland Citizen of the Year by the Oakland Tribune and named one of America’s leading African American Allergist by Black Enterprise Magazine.  Since 2000, Dr. Lenoir has been named as one of the 200 best physicians by San Francisco or by Oakland Magazine. He has served as the President of the Ethnic Health Institute at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Chair of the Board of the African American Wellness Project. He has served as a member of the Board of Directors at Children’s Hospital Oakland. From 1981 to 1993, Dr. LeNoir served as the medical editor for KCBS radio, hosting a 2 hour weekly talk show. Since 1985, he has been the CEO of the Ethnic Health America Network that produces the Telly award winning Ethnic Health America Program, a 30-minute TV health magazine at one time aired in 1400 cities nationwide on MBC Network. He continues to do radio and podcast programs, such as Black Doctors Speak collaborating with blackdoctors.org.  He has 4 daughters and 5 grandchildren.

The Intersection of Climate Action, Social Justice, and Healthcare

Listen Now: https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=336205

 

About Health on KPFA.org, 94.1FM, (6/29/20)

A recent article that caught my attention in the New York Times stated: “Climate Change Tied to Pregnancy Risks, Affecting Black Mothers Most.” 

We can’t tackle the Climate Emergency, Health Disparities, and Social Justice in isolation. We need to look at policies and approaches that promote health and well being for individuals, communities, and the world.

Guest: Angel V. Shannon, MS, CRNP, is a board-certified adult-geriatric nurse practitioner with over twenty-five years experience in chronic disease management and mind-body medicine. She is the founder and clinical director of Seva Health and Seva Health Media, providing integrative healthcare and education for adults and seniors. Drawing upon a childhood immersed in environmental stewardship and decades of diverse clinical experiences in critical care, emergency medicine, trauma care, community home health, and insurance administration, Angel takes a unique, whole person approach to disease prevention in her private practice.

Angel holds strong ties to community and public health, serving as an active board member of the Maryland Community Research Advisory Board at the University of Maryland School of Public Health Center for Health Equity (MD-CRAB), and a former adjunct professor of Family and Community Health at Pennsylvania State University College of Nursing. An avid gardener, she recently earned her Master Gardener Certification from the University of Maryland Extension and is working to develop community based gardening programs for active seniors. Her latest career endeavor is creation of the Seva Institute, an organization that redefines healthcare and continues her scholarship in mind-body medicine, provides organizational training in mindfulness based stress reduction, individual coaching and personalized restorative retreats. Learn more at www.sevahealthgroup.com

Social Determinants of Health

On About Health, 4/1/19 we discussed the social determinants of health, and how some communities are coming together to build a better life!

Listen now: https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=307588

“The strain of living in a poor neighborhood, with subpar schools, lack of parks, fear of violence, and few to no healthy food options, is literally taking years off of people’s lives.” —Twenty Years of Life

Good health is not just an individual choice. Where you live, your access to healthy food, your exposure to toxins, your children’s ability to play outside, your chronic stress, your income, and the quality of schools, all impact the health of your family. We need to rethink the root causes of disease.

Guests: 

Suzanne Bohan, author of Twenty Years of Life, covered health and science for twelve years with the Bay Area News Group, which includes the San Jose Mercury News, Contra Costa Times, and OaklandTribune. She has won nearly twenty journalism awards, including a White House Correspondents’ Association award for her reporting on health disparities. She has a master’s degree in journalism from Stanford and a bachelor’s degree in biology. Suzanne Bohan is coauthor of 50 Simple Ways to Live a Longer Life: Everyday Techniques from the Forefront of Science. 

 

Jason Corburn, PhD, is a Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, jointly appointed in the Department of City & Regional Planning and the School of Public Health. He directs Berkeley’s Institute of Urban and Regional Development, a  joint Master of City Planning (MCP) and Master of Public Health (MPH) degree program, and he leads the Center for Global Healthy Cities. His research focuses on the links between environmental health and social justice in cities, notions of expertise in science-based policy making, and the role of local knowledge in addressing environmental and public health problems. To learn about Jason’s extensive experience and publications go to https://www.jasoncorburn.com. 

Roots of Health Disparities

If you missed the January 16th show on KPFA  about The Roots of Health Disparities you can hear it now at https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=251021

 

images“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice

in health care is the most shocking and

inhuman.”

—Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

“Decades of racially discriminatory policies have marginalized people of color in every way, including in areas of housing, transportation, education, employment, and health. In spite of civil rights laws passed 50 years ago—people of color still face barriers on nearly every quality-of-life measure.”

—”Health Equity As a Critical Civil Rights Issue,” PolicyLink, 2015

GUESTS:

Dr. Muntu Davis is the Public Health Department Director and County Health Officer in Alameda County, California. He advises the County Board of Supervisors, local government agencies, and community members and organizations on medical and public health issues and on the development and implementation of public health policy and practices. He also provides oversight, strategic direction, and fiscal management of the department and all of its divisions. He joined the ACPHD in October 2005. Prior to working Alameda County, he worked in the Immunization Branch of the California Department of Health Services on pandemic planning and education on febrile rash evaluation. He also practiced medicine in urban and rural primary care and urgent care clinics in Northern and Southern California. He held multiple positions at the Continuity of Instruction to Reinforce Our Children’s Learning Environment (C.I.R.C.L.E.) program at the Tom Bradley Elementary School including co-director and member of the board of directors. Dr. Davis completed a residency in Family Medicine at Presbyterian Intercommunity Hospital in Whittier, California. He completed The California Endowment Scholars in Health Policy Fellowship and received his Master of Public Health degree from Harvard School of Public Health.

Dalila Butler, Associate Director, works with the PolicyLink Center for Health Equity and Place to promote social, economic and health equity through environmental and policy change, particularly in low-income communities and communities of color. Dalila serves as the California Department of Public Health Office of Health Equity Advisory Committee Chair. She also provides technical assistance to communities across the country and supports research and writing for health team projects. She supports the Boys and Men of Color team by working with networks in advancing policy and practice to advance equity in the areas of health, education, employment, and juvenile justice. Prior to joining PolicyLink, Dalila supported health equity projects at Prevention Institute. She holds a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from North Carolina State University and a Masters in Public Health from San Diego State University.