Embracing Shame

 

Shame is a universal social emotion meant to keep us out of trouble. It may be expressed in many ways including perfectionism or feeling worthless. It can be hard to detect shame since it can bind with other emotions, such as grief, anger, or fear. Shame can be transformed from a self-punishing emotion into an ally supporting our well being and health.

Listen now to KPFA radio, 94.1FM, (2/5/24)

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=414946

Guests:

Bret Lyon, PhD, SEP, and Sheila Rubin, MA, LMFT, RDT/BCT, are long-time helping professionals who have devoted the last twenty years of their lives to healing shame. They are the founders and co-directors of the Center for Healing Shame. Through their workshops, they have taught thousands of therapists, coaches, and other helping professionals from all over the world how to more effectively identify and work with shame.

Sheila is a licensed marriage and family therapist, a registered drama therapist, and has taught at JFK University and CIIS, as well as being the eating disorder specialist at a hospital and directing Embodied Life Stories performances. Bret holds doctorates in both psychology and drama and has taught at Tufts University, Pomona College, and the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, as well as written and directed plays in regional theater and off-off Broadway.

Sheila and Bret are married and live in Oakland, California. When they are not working to heal the planet through healing shame, Sheila devotes herself to painting, and Bret puts his soul into photographing birds and other wildlife. Please visit healingshame.com to discover more about them and their work.

African American Wellness

About Health on 94.1FM—KPFA.org, 1/15/23 

Listen now: https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=413898

In celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. we will discuss African American Wellness. The harsh reality is that not all patients are treated equally, and racism has consequences on a person’s health and health care. An Associated Press wire story from 1966, contained Dr. King’s famous quotation regarding injustice in health care—“Of all the forms of in-equality, injustice in health, is the most shocking and in-human.” 

My guest today, Dr Michael Lenoir, has been committed to the health and well-being of the African American community for a long time now…believing that “Healthcare is a fundamental right.”

Guest: Dr. Michael Lenoir

Dr. LeNoir has been the CEO of the Ethnic Health America Network, and currently he is CEO and Chairperson of the African American Wellness Project and the host and producer of the Black Doctors Speak Podcast. He is a board-certified, practicing pediatrician in Oakland, and a nationally recognized expert on asthma in inner cities. In the past he served as president of the Ethnic Health Institute at Alta Bates/Summit Medical Center and associate clinical professor in pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco. He has been an active member of the National Medical Association and was the 114th President. Dr. Lenore was the host of About Health Radio show on KPFA.org for over 20 years.

Reducing Chemical Exposures

Have you wondered about the safety of the products you use to keep your home clean, or the chemicals that are in your lipstick or hair products? Did you know that you may be putting asbestos, formaldehyde, or even lead on your hair or lips?  Toxic chemicals in our cosmetics, sunscreens, and skin care products are unregulated, and many cleaning produces, non-stick frying pans, or water resistance clothes, may contain the toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS.  Recent reports from the United States Environmental Protection Agency reveal that PFAS may be a bigger issue than we originally thought.

Every day we’re exposed to toxic chemicals in the air, water, food, and in the products we use. The more we know, the better chance we have of making good choices for our health and the health of our children.

Listen now to About Health 11/6/23, KPFA radio—94.1FM

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=410192

 

Guest:

Kaley Beins is a Senior Scientist at the Environmental Working Group (EWG). She focuses on the intersection of public health and toxicology, specifically improving human health by reducing chemical exposures. Before joining EWG, she worked for the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, where she contributed to consensus studies and organized federally funded workshops. Prior to her work at the National Academies, she helped develop toxicological profiles for the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, and supported green chemistry and product labeling programs for the Environmental Protection Agency. She has also contributed to community health and environmental justice initiatives at nonprofits and local health departments. Kaley is active in the Washington, D.C., chapter of the Sigma Xi Scientific Research Honor Society as vice president, was a Fulbright Research Fellow, and co-hosts a medical education podcast. She is an associate member of the Society of Toxicology.

 

Befriending Your Vagus Nerve

Listen now to About Health–8/28/23

https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=406461

There has been a lot of talk about the Vagus Nerve these days, so I decided to do a show to learn more about how it functions, and how it can help us during times of stress or illness. The vagus nerve is one of the longest and most important of 12 cranial nerves in our bodies, and it connects our brain to our gut, and affects our mood, digestion, heart rate, immune response, and much more.

Join me and my guest Amelia Barili to learn about the Vagus Nerve and ways it can help us respond instead of react and calm ourselves in these challenging times.

 

Guest

AMELIA BARILI PhD, travelled the world studying ancient traditions on how to develop good health from the inside out. She received her diploma in Yoga Therapy and Philosophy, in 1972, at Kaivalyadhama Yoga Institute, India. Having also studied the Medical Qigong system with old Chinese masters, Amelia is a pioneer at integrating both wisdom traditions. She has brought these ancient contemplative practices into the academic environment and teaches meditative techniques as tools to overcome stress and foster deep learning. She is an award-winning faculty at UC Berkeley and the Osher LifeLong Learning Institute, where she teaches youth and older adults a systematic embodied mind approach for personal and community transformation. Since March 2020 she has been offering, and continues to offer, free Saturday online classes. The classes integrate Yoga, Qigong, and Neuroscience to teach participants how to work with their nervous system to maintain good health, resilience, and inner strength. She just finished teaching a nine weeks course with Dr. Stephen Porges, at the Polyvagal Institute, on “Embodying Safety: Integrating Yoga, Qigong and Polyvagal Theory.” For more information about Dr. Barili’s work and to join her Saturday classes visit ameliabarili.com and her YouTube channel thenewparadigms.

Inherited Trauma and Resilience

Listen now *https://kpfa.org/player/?audio=404968*

KPFA Radio, 94.1FM,  7/31/23 

Joining me was author Elizabeth Rosner, discussing her book, Survivor Café: The Legacy of Trauma and the Labyrinth of Memory, where she looks at how descendants of atrocities cope with inherited trauma.

Guest

Elizabeth Rosner is an author, teacher, and lecturer whose work focuses on the redemptive power of storytelling and deep listening. Her books have been translated into ten languages and have received several literary prizes in the US and abroad. Her most recent book of creative nonfiction, Survivor Café: The Legacy of Trauma and the Labyrinth of Memory, explores the intergenerational aftermath of atrocities while offering hard-won hope for individual as well as collective resilience. Raised in upstate New York as the daughter of two Holocaust survivors, Elizabeth’s writing interweaves personal reflection with scholarly research, revealing the profoundly resonant impacts of the past upon the present. She leads writing workshops locally in Berkeley as well as internationally; her teaching carries forward a message of perseverance and tenacious optimism.

More about all of her work can be found on her website: www.elizabethrosner.com.